Megiddo: The Great City Become Desert

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If cities have been built (and are being built) in deserts, so can the power of the desert absorb cities, returning them after many centuries to the substance from which they were first made. The great symbolic example is Megiddo – once a great city state, now an archaeological site, and a symbol of the end of the age. This reminds us of the impermanence of the “city desert” and of the eventual dissolution of all worldly triumphs, as reflected in Shelley’s “Ozymandias”.
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“Megiddo (Hebrew: מגידו‎; Arabic: المجیدو‎, Tell al-Mutesellim) is a tell in modern Israel near Kibbutz Megiddo, about 30 km south-east of Haifa, known for its historical, geographical, and theological importance, especially under its Greek name Armageddon. In ancient times Megiddo was an important city-state. Excavations have unearthed 26 layers of ruins, indicating a long period of settlement. Megiddo is strategically located at the head of a pass through the Carmel Ridge overlooking the Jezreel Valley from the west….
Megiddo is also known as Greek: Μεγιδδώ/Μαγεδδών, Megiddó/Mageddón in the Septuagint; Latin: Mageddo; Assyrian: Magiddu, Magaddu; Magidda and Makida in the Amarna tablets; Egyptian: Maketi, Makitu, and Makedo. The Book of Revelation mentions an apocalyptic military amassment at Armageddon, a name derived from the Hebrew “Har Megiddo” meaning “Mount of Megiddo”. ‘Armageddon’ has become a byword for the end of the age.”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tel_Megiddo
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“Ozymandias“ (1818)
“I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed:
And on the pedestal these words appear:
“My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.”
ozymandias1
“Ozymandias” represents a transliteration into Greek of a part of Ramesses’ throne name, User-maat-re Setep-en-re. The sonnet paraphrases the inscription on the base of the statue, given by Diodorus Siculus in his “Bibliotheca historica”, as “King of Kings am I, Osymandias. If anyone should like to know my grandeur and reach of stature, let him surpass any of my achievements.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozymandias
Percy_Bysshe_Shelley_by_Alfred_Clint_crop
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

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