Saint Jerome: The Lives of Three Hermits

Jerome 1
“Saint Jerome (Latin: Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus; Greek: Εὐσέβιος Σωφρόνιος Ἱερώνυμος; c.  347 – 30 September 420) was an Illyrian Latin Christian priest, confessor, theologian and historian, who also became a Doctor of the Church. He was the son of Eusebius, of the city of Stridon, on the border of Dalmatia and Pannonia. He is best known for his translation of the Bible into Latin (the Vulgate), and his commentaries on the Gospel of the Hebrews. His list of writings is extensive.”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerome
Jerome 2
“Saint Jerome Writing”, also called “Saint Jerome in His Study” or simply “Saint Jerome”, an oil painting by Italian painter Michelangelo Merisi (or Amerighi) da Caravaggio ( 1571?-? 1610), generally dated to 1605-1606; the painting is located in the Galleria Borghese in Rome.

Saint Jerome wrote four works of a hagiographic nature:
• the “Vita Pauli monachi”, written during his first sojourn at Antioch (ca. 376), the legendary material of which is derived from Egyptian monastic tradition;
• the “Vitae Patrum” (“Vita Pauli primi eremitae”), a biography of Saint Paul of Thebes;
• the “Vita Malchi monachi captive” (ca. 391), probably based on an earlier work, although it purports to be derived from the oral communications of the aged ascetic Malchus originally made to him in the desert of Chalcis;
• the “Vita Hilarionis”, of the same date, containing more trustworthy historical matter than the other two, and based partly on the biography of Epiphanius and partly on oral tradition.
Jerome Three Biographies
Saint Jerome “Three biographies: Malchus, St. Hilarion and Paulus the First Hermit” [CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013]: “Saint Jerome is an ancient Latin Christian priest, confessor, theologian and historian, and who became a Doctor of the Church. Though often considered exclusively a saint of the Roman Catholic Church, Jerome was a Latin Christian who predated the East-West Schism which occurred in the 11th century. He was the son of Eusebius, of the city of Stridon, which was on the border of Dalmatia and Pannonia. He is best known for his translation of the Bible into Latin (the Vulgate), and his commentaries on the Gospel of the Hebrews. His list of writings is extensive. He is recognised by the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Lutheran Church, and the Church of England (Anglican Communion) as a Saint. Jerome is commemorated on 30 September with a memorial. The “Vitae Patrum” (“Vita Pauli primi eremitae”), a biography of Saint Paul of Thebes; the “Vita Malchi monachi captive” (ca. 391), probably based on an earlier work, although it purports to be derived from the oral communications of the aged ascetic Malchus originally made to him in the desert of Chalcis; the “Vita Hilarionis”, of the same date, containing more trustworthy historical matter than the other two, and based partly on the biography of Epiphanius and partly on oral tradition.”
PaultheFirstHermit
“The Life of Paulus the First Hermit”: The Life of Paulus was written in the year 374 or 375 during Jerome’s stay in the desert of Syria, as is seen from c. 6, and was dedicated to Paulus of Concordia as stated in Jerome’s Ep. x. c. 3.
Text available on-line at: http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf206.vi.i.html
See further:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_of_Thebes
http://orthodoxwiki.org/Paul_of_Thebes
Hilarion the Hermit
“The Life of Saint Hilarion the Hermit”: “S. Jerome’s “Vita S. Hilarionis Eremytæ”, written in Bethlehem A.D. 390, is a vividly detailed narration of the life of a Fourth Century monastic leader who would otherwise be known only from a few scattered references. It is also an exciting tale of high adventure, consciously meant by its author — one of the most talented writers of late antiquity — as competition for the popular novels of the day. The reader will find depicted here a chariot race, a menacing pirate ship, a tsunami, and much else — even a whiny, sarcastic demon in a magic mirror! But what is most memorable in the long run is S. Hilarion himself, longing desperately for solitude and obscurity, roaming the world anonymously to escape his reputation as a wonder-worker, but never able to harden himself toward the suffering of those in need of healing.”
Text available on-line at: http://www.voskrese.info/spl/jer-hilarion.html
See further:
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07347a.htm
http://www.ewtn.com/library/MARY/HILARION.HTM
Malchus the Hermit
“The Life of Malchus, The Captive Monk”: The life of Malchus was written at Bethlehem, a.d. 391. Text available on-line at: http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/3006.htm and http://www.intratext.com/IXT/ENG1303/
See also: http://www.fourthcentury.com/jerome-life-of-malchus/
See further: http://www.ccel.org/ccel/wace/biodict.html?term=Malchus,%20a%20hermit%20in%20Syria
http://kateriirondequoit.org/resources/saints-alive/macarius-mutien-marie/st-malchus/

See further:
Cain & Lossl jacket
Andrew Cain and Josef Lössl “Jerome of Stridon: His Life, Writings and Legacy” [Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2009]: “Jerome of Stridon (c.346-420) is arguably the greatest polymath in Latin Christian antiquity; this is the most comprehensive and up to date volume on his life and work available in English today. Familiar debates are re-opened, hitherto uncharted terrain is explored, and problems old and new are posed and solved with the use of innovative methodologies. This is an indispensable resource not only for specialists on Jerome but also for students and scholars who cultivate interests broadly in the history, religion, society, and literature of the late antique Christian world.”

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