A Commentary on The Psalms

The Psalms were at the heart of the Prayer life of the Desert Fathers and Mothers. Although there are now some excellent Patristic guides to reading and studying the Psalms, a long out-of-print and rarely available (and then only at great expense) commentary using a range of ancient sources is that by the 19th century Anglican scholars, Neale and Littledale.
Coptic Psalms
J. M. (John Mason) Neale (1818-1866) and Richard Frederick Littledale (1833-1890) “A Commentary on the Psalms: From Primitive and Mediaeval Writers; and from the various office-books and hymns of the Roman, Mazarabic, Ambrosian, Gallican, Greek, Coptic, Armenian, and Syrian Rites” [Joseph Masters, London, 1868, pp.2191] – Vol. 1. Psalm I to Psalm XXXVIII – Vol. 2. Psalm XXXIX to Psalm LXXX.- Vol. 3. Psalm LXXXI to Psalm CXVIII – Vol. 4. Psalm CXIX to Psalm CL, with index of Scripture references.
Neale Psalms
In “Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers”, editors J. M. Neale and R. F. Littledale have condensed the writings of the Church Fathers and other important writers from the Middle Ages into a verse-by-verse commentary of all 150 Psalms. This unique four-volume collection weaves together commentary on the Psalms from the Venerable Bede, Dionysius the Carthusian, Cyril of Alexandria, Gregory the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Saint Augustine, and many more. Additionally, Neale and Littledale reference various office-books and hymns from the Roman, Mozarabic, Ambrosian, Gallican, Greek, Coptic, Armenian, and Syriac Rites.
Volume one of the “Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers” covers Psalms 1–38. In addition to verse-by-verse commentary, each Psalm includes an introduction and various thoughts from the writings of the Church Fathers. Volume one also includes an in-depth introduction to the series, which includes two dissertations: “The Psalms as Employed in the Offices of the Church” and “Primitive and Mediæval Commentators on the Psalms,” which provides concise biographical notices of the principal commentators referenced in all four volumes. A third dissertation, “The Mystical and Literal Interpretation of the Psalms,” will be found after the thirtieth Psalm.
Neale psalm page
Volume two of the “Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers” covers Psalms 39–80. In addition to verse-by-verse commentary, each Psalm includes an introduction and various thoughts from the writings of the Church Fathers. A dissertation, “Chronology and Authorship of the Psalms,” explores the “original” order of the Psalms and discusses the many problems of trying to discern their “true” chronological sequence.
Volume three of the “Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers” covers Psalms 81–118. In addition to verse-by-verse commentary, each Psalm includes an introduction and various thoughts from the writings of the Church Fathers.
Volume four of the “Commentary on the Psalms from Primitive and Mediæval Writers” covers Psalms 119–150. In addition to verse-by-verse commentary, each Psalm includes an introduction and various thoughts from the writings of the Church Fathers. This volume also includes the dissertation “The Psalms as Used in the Sacraments and Rites of the Church” and provides an index of Scripture references for the entire collection.

Available on-line at: https://archive.org/details/commentaryonpsal02nealuoft [PDF] and http://www.ecatholic2000.com/neale/untitled-827.shtml [text]

The work is available in electronic searchable format: https://www.logos.com/product/15531/commentary-on-the-psalms-from-primitive-and-mediaeval-writers

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: